Imaging the life-cycle of CMCs using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography

Peter J. Creveling, Noel LeBaron, Michael W Czabaj

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In this study, the entire life cycle of a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) manufactured using polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) is imaged using high-resolution X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT). The entire PIP process is imaged ex situ to capture the evolution of voids and shrinkage cracks during laminate densification. After manufacturing, two specimens are extracted from the CMC laminate, and subsequently tested to failure in flexure and tension at 1000°C. Gray-scale image segmentation methods are used to quantify the evolution of porosity within the microstructure during PIP processing. X-ray μCT image results from in situ testing are qualitatively examined to quantify presence of individual fiber breaks, fiber pull-outs, matrix cracking, fiber-matrix decohesion, to name a few. These results are used to motivate development of new algorithms for segmentation of microstructural features from X-ray μCT data sets.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages303-306
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Polymer matrix composites
Ceramic matrix composites
Computerized tomography
Microstructural evolution
Ceramic materials
Image segmentation
Infiltration
Silicon carbide
Tomography
Life cycle
Pyrolysis
Imaging techniques
X rays
Laminates
Fibers
Polymers
Densification
Mechanics
Porosity
Cracks

Keywords

  • Ceramic matrix composites
  • Silicon-carbide/silicon-carbide
  • X-ray micro-computed tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Creveling, P. J., LeBaron, N., & Czabaj, M. W. (2019). Imaging the life-cycle of CMCs using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography. In Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series (pp. 303-306). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-95510-0_40

Imaging the life-cycle of CMCs using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography. / Creveling, Peter J.; LeBaron, Noel; Czabaj, Michael W.

Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. Springer New York LLC, 2019. p. 303-306.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Creveling, PJ, LeBaron, N & Czabaj, MW 2019, Imaging the life-cycle of CMCs using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography. in Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. Springer New York LLC, pp. 303-306. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-95510-0_40
Creveling PJ, LeBaron N, Czabaj MW. Imaging the life-cycle of CMCs using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography. In Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. Springer New York LLC. 2019. p. 303-306 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-95510-0_40
Creveling, Peter J. ; LeBaron, Noel ; Czabaj, Michael W. / Imaging the life-cycle of CMCs using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography. Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. Springer New York LLC, 2019. pp. 303-306
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