SPIDER: A Framework for Understanding Driver Distraction

David L. Strayer, Donald L. Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 8 Citations

Abstract

Objective: The objective was to identify key cognitive processes that are impaired when drivers divert attention from driving. Background: Driver distraction is increasingly recognized as a significant source of injuries and fatalities on the roadway. Method/Results: A "SPIDER" model is developed that identifies key cognitive processes that are impaired when drivers divert attention from driving. SPIDER is an acronym standing for scanning, predicting, identifying, decision making, and executing a response. Conclusion: When drivers engage in secondary activities unrelated to the task of driving, SPIDER-related processes are impaired, situation awareness is degraded, and the ability to safely operate a motor vehicle may be compromised. Application: The pattern of interference helps to illuminate the sources of driver distraction and may help guide the integration of new technology into the automobile.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages5-12
Number of pages8
JournalHuman Factors
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Automobiles
Decision making
driver
Scanning
Aptitude
Motor Vehicles
Decision Making
motor vehicle
Technology
Wounds and Injuries
new technology
interference
decision making
ability

Keywords

  • attention
  • driver distraction
  • multitasking
  • self-regulation
  • situation awareness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Applied Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

SPIDER : A Framework for Understanding Driver Distraction. / Strayer, David L.; Fisher, Donald L.

In: Human Factors, Vol. 58, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 5-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strayer, David L. ; Fisher, Donald L. / SPIDER : A Framework for Understanding Driver Distraction. In: Human Factors. 2016 ; Vol. 58, No. 1. pp. 5-12.
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